Text Box: Home buyers most frequently asked
QUESTIONS ... AND ANSWERS!

Getting the "WORD OUT" about the NEW HOME BUILDING PROCESS and the IMPORTANCE OF CONSTRUCTION INSPECTIONS during, and soon after, a HOUSE IS BUILT !
An overwhelming number of our clients have asked us how they can help "get the word out" about the importance and value of our "HOMEPROFILED" CONSTRUCTION INSPECTION PROGRAM! Our clients want you to know about the good work we've done for them. They've found that a quality "builder" does care about their clients and appreciate what we do; a "builder" that's quick to respond and correct problems that were overlooked during construction. Other "HOMEPROFILED" clients have realized they selected one of the "other builders"...one who simply cares more about producing a "unit" and making a profit then they do about building a quality home! Many of our clients look back in time and realize there was a "red flag", that moment in time, when they're "builder's” attitude suddenly changed!  Everyone knows no house is perfect...but we'll do our part to get it there. 

Typical FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS:

"Is my builder a good builder and how does he compare to others in the business?" The odds are you haven't hired a "builder" but a "contract brokerage" company!   the answer

"My 'builder' told me that during different stages of completion my house will be "inspected and passed" by a county inspector...I don't need to hire a private construction inspector.”  Of course he did, why?   the answer

"After a home has 'passed' a county inspection doesn't that mean that everything is installed properly and safe?"  the answer

"Should I hire a private inspector during the construction of my house?"   the answer

"I've been told that private inspectors must be licensed to perform new house construction inspections in Virginia...is that a requirement?"   the answer 

"I didn't have my home inspected during construction, is it to late to hire a private inspector?"   
	the answer 

"What can I do after I've moving in and find problems that are cosmetic and related to poor workmanship and not covered by the building codes?"   the answer

"Since I moved into my home I've found what I believe are problems. My “builder"  (subcontractor/ installer) is trying to convince me that there's nothing wrong."      the answer
 
"How can I make my "builder" correct problems during or after construction?”  In no uncertain terms, having a home built is a major business transaction!   the answer



Extended answers.




"Is my builder a good builder and how does he compare to others in the business?" 

The odds are you haven't hired a "builder" but a "contract brokerage" company! The vast majority of companies that call themselves "builders" don't build a house themselves...they're business is to hire subcontractors to "produce a unit". Virtually all work is "brokered out" to subcontractors who come in, assemble part of the house, and leave! Working conditions and crews routinely change from house to house. It's simply a matter of chance whether the crews and installers assigned to assemble your house are better, or worse, then any others!





"My 'builder' told me that during different stages of completion my house will be "inspected and passed" by a county inspector...I don't need to hire a private construction inspector. 

Of course he did! Why? Because your "builder" knows that county inspectors are typically so overwhelmed its impossible for them to conduct a thorough inspection of each house during construction. On average, county inspectors are expected to conduct between 15 and 22 inspections per day. At best, county inspectors don't inspect a house, they do an "audit" or "spot check". It's not possible for them to do a thorough inspection with such a heavy work load. For most "builders" producing a unit on time and within budget is their top priority. Making changes and corrections are disruptions to their schedule to be avoided at all costs. Making matters worse, some "builders" have an attitude that "what the buyer can't see, or doesn't know, won't hurt us"!





"After a home has 'passed' a county inspection doesn't that mean that everything is installed properly and safe?" 

No! Follow-ups by qualified private inspectors in a number of communities identified numerous code violations overlooked by the county inspectors!   Its important to know that the building code differs to the product manufacturer's installation instructions and specifications. Virtually everything installed in a house is produced or processed at remote locations and delivered to the job site. Every product, component and appliance must be properly installed to meet the code requirements. County inspectors rarely, if ever, review documents to determine if installation guidelines have been meet or not. Here's a list of common examples of what is routinely found by private inspectors after a county inspector has "passed" the house: 
Houses not attached to their foundations. Anchor bolts and straps not properly installed or missing.
Active leaks in water supply and waste drain lines.
Electrical wiring with bare "hot" ends exposed, not properly installed or connected.
Gas furnace and water heater exhaust vents not connected releasing carbon monoxide into the house.
Heating and cooling supply and return duct lines not connected or missing.
Garage doors not properly installed. Bolts and bracing required for the doors and openers are missing.
Major structural components: roof trusses, engineered floor joists, steel I-beams and columns missing, damaged or not properly installed.
Attic insulation not installed evenly or deep enough or completely missing.
Fire stop insufficient or not installed in critical locations.
Electrical system wires not connected to ground rods.





"Should I hire a private inspector during the construction of my house?" 

Yes, in virtually ever instance, problems identified by a qualified private construction inspector can be easily corrected during construction if the "builder" is willing to cooperation!   An experienced private inspector should have a thorough understanding and knowledge of all phases of home building technology and residential code requirements. Problems that routinely go undetected and hidden in finished basements, behind walls and in attic areas can evolve into serious, and costly, problems long after your "builder" is gone. Private inspectors will look for conditions that the average buyer wouldn't, or couldn't, recognize or understand. If these conditions are not identified and corrected during, or soon after, your home is finished, it's likely that you, the home owner, will be paying for future repairs inherited from your "builder"!





"I've been told that private inspectors must be licensed to perform new house construction inspections in Virginia...is that a requirement?" 

No! not at this time. The Virginia Board of Licensing and Regulations has no current requirements for private inspectors to be "licensed" to do construction and home inspections. Anyone with questions is encouraged to call the "Virginia Board of Licensing and Regulations" in Richmond for additional information.





"I didn't have my home inspected during construction, is it to late to hire a private inspector?" 

No! The residential home building codes are the lowest legal level a house must be built to by law. These code are in affect for a period of TWO FULL YEARS after an occupancy permit is issued and you go to closing. If code violations are identified during the first two year period of ownership, the "builder" should be held responsible for making the necessary repairs...not you, the homeowner!





"What can I do after I've moving in and find problems that are cosmetic and related to poor workmanship and not covered by the building codes?" 

Virginia (Statue# 55-70-1), The "Implied warranties on new homes" states that "the new home will be constructed in a workmanship manner, so as to pass without objection in the trade." What this means is that any owner of a recently built home should have a REASONABLE EXPECTATION that their "builder" will meet the industry standards of quality workmanship, application of materials and building techniques for new home construction accepted throughout the industry.





"Since I moved into my home I've found what I believe are problems. My "builder" (subcontractor/ installer) is trying to convince me that there's nothing wrong." 

One of the biggest mistakes any homeowner can make is to ask the "builder" or installer who did the initial work to evaluate their own work! There may not be a problem, however, if they didn't do the work right the first time its unlikely they'll admit to a problem in the future. It's not uncommon for a "builder" (subcontractor or installer) to believe they did the work correctly...after all, they'll tell you that's how they've been "doing it for years"! Unfortunately, they may have been doing it wrong for years! There's a phrase used in the building industry known as "caught not taught". In the past, a person became a tradesman by going through a long apprenticeship. Today, many installers believe they know what they're doing simply because they're in the building business. Many never read installation instructions, let alone, have any quality training. If what they "caught" on the job was wrong they'll continue to do it wrong! It's a common practice that the workers who are employed by a license holder don't have licensing or certifications themselves. Ultimately, you, the buyer, may be paying for they're lack of training and credentials.





"How can I make my "builder" correct problems during or after construction? 

In no uncertain terms, having a home built is a major business transaction! That's the approach every "builder" takes; and so should you. It's always possible a disagreement or dispute might arise between the parties. Your first step is to properly identify and document any problems. When you notify your "builder" you've hired a private construction inspector as a member of your team you'll be sending him a strong message. Not surprisingly, the quality of work and the "builders" cooperation typically improves significantly during, and after, your home is built!

For answers to your question or concerns about the home buying, building process email us at:

 

INFO@HOMEPROFILED.COM

 

OR CALL

(540 898-1199

 

 

HOMEPROFILED

of VIRGINIA

FREQUENTLY ASKED

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